You just won the Super Bowl. How much will the payday be?

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The winners of Super Bowl LVII might get a free trip to Disney World, but anyone who played in the game will go home with more than enough for a pretty extravagant vacation.

Yes, of course, the point of the game is bragging rights for the Vince Lombardi Trophy and the glory that comes with that. But players who make it to the end of the NFL season get a nice financial bump as well. The amounts each player pockets, though, depend on a variety of factors.

How much will the winners of the Super Bowl LVII get paid?

According to the latest Collective Bargaining Agreement with the NFL, each member of the winning team will pocket $157,000, a $7,000 bump over what the Los Angeles Rams earned last year. Winners of Super Bowl LVIII next year will receive $164,000.

They’ll get those checks within 15 days of the game.

How much will the losers of the Super Bowl LVII get paid?

While it doesn’t take away the sting of defeat, the $82,000 players on the losing team will earn could make them feel a little better. Like the winners that’s $7,000 more than the Bengals collected a year ago. And next year’s total will jump the same amount.

Does every player get paid the same amount?

They do not. Depending on their length of time in the league and their roster status, some players could only receive half of the amounts above. Here’s how it breaks down.

Players get a full bonus if…

  • They’ve played at least three previous games during the regular season or playoffs and are on the team’s active or inactive list when the Super Bowl is played
  • They’ve played at least eight previous games (regular or post-season), regardless of whether they’re on the active/inactive list or not.
  • They’re a veteran player who was injured during the regular season, but are still under contract.

Players get 50% of the bonus if…

  • They’ve played fewer than three previous games during the regular season or playoffs and are on the team’s active or inactive list when the Super Bowl is played
  • They’re not on the active/inactive list, but played between three and seven games during the regular season or playoffs.
  • They’re a first-year player who was injured during the regular season, but are still under contract.

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